Tag Archives: texas turkey hunting

Rio Grande Turkey!

Cruising down the back roads of Kerr County, TX is an interesting experience.

The majority of wildlife spotted is exotic and much of it ranging beyond the confines of high fenced hunting ranches. Axis deer, blackbuck antelope and aoudad are more are prevalent than even native whitetail.

I was looking for wild turkeys, the Rio Grand variety in particular as I am on a quest to get the Grand Slam (Rio Grande, Merriam’s, Eastern and Oceola subspecies) by camera this year.

It started off super slow two weeks ago with a trip to the area surrounding Palmetto State Park near Luling, TX.

I saw a lone turkey at about 200 yards but we could not get it to come any closer despite calling.

My rule for this project is the pictures must be magazine quality. In other words up close and full of detail.

Just as the sun began to peek out of an early morning haze I spotted three turkeys on a hill. Fellow wildlife photographer Gerald Burleigh stopped the truck and my friend and fellow turkey fanatic Josh Slone jumped out and started calling.

I ran down below the bird’s line of sight, walked up to a bush and shot a few pics.

Then down the fence line came a loud gobble.

I spun around to see two large gobblers trying to figure out how to get over the fence to get to the hens that had just flown over.

Apparently these guys were so love struck (after all it is breeding season) they forgot they can you know…fly.

turkey gobble edit
One down-three to go! These two gobblers were trying to find their way over a fence that three hens had just flew over. (Photo by Chester Moore, Jr.)

This worked to my advantage as they paced up and down and I slid down about 30 yards and waited.

The birds eventually made the move and moved into range and I took dozens of shots before their pursuit of the hens continued.

It was so exciting to get these birds after so much hard work.

Getting the Rio Grande photo above took the following effort.

*Two Trips from Orange, TX to Hill Country

*28 hours total driving

*$450 in hotels and gas

*16 hours searching in the field

Since the quest began I have studied historical maps of turkey range and found there should be Rio Grande in good numbers much closer to home. The drive should be cut from six hours to about three but urban sprawl and degraded habitat on top of poaching many years ago have isolated them more than people think.

Texas has around 500,000 birds with the vast majority being Rios with a few hundred Merriam’s in the Trans Pecos and about 7,000 easterns in the Pineywoods.

Turkeys are not nearly as adaptable as whitetails.

Getting what so far is the best turkey photo I have ever taken gave me an even greater respect for those conservation-minded turkey hunters who pursue the Grand Slam and wanting to learn much more about these regal birds.

Step one was hard considering I am doing this in my “spare” time and totally on my coin to raise awareness to turkey conservation and the health of America’s forests.

But I have a feeling finding Rios will be a walk in the park compared to some of the other varieties.

I plan on pushing hard for eastern in the coming two weeks. I’ve already had two days searching for them in the national forests of Texas with no success.

I might have a line on some birds in Louisiana and as I researched that state’s turkey population I found there is a story that needs to be told.

After all people will only conserve what they care for and understand.

And that’s what this Turkey Revolution is all about-unveiling the story of America’s greatest game bird so their future and that of America’s forest is secure.

Chester Moore, Jr.

 

 

A Turkey Revolution Has Begun!

A society can only value what it understands.

And with wildlife, understanding is only the beginning. People must find a way to appreciate wild animals enough to care whether or not they exist.

Throughout decades of research, time spent in the field from Canada to California to seemingly every corner of my home state of Texas, I have come to a conclusion.

No creature in North America is linked more to healthy forests than the wild turkey. And no creature has the potential to captivate people in all corners of the nation than these great birds.

The author was busted by this big gobbler as he tried to sneak up near a tree on his belly. These free-ranging birds on a ranch didn’t know if they were tame, wild or in between but this one showed no fear. Good thing the author’s wife Lisa was set up in an elevated position just a few yards away and caught this photo.

Whether they are the striking Rio Grandes in the Texas Hill Country, Eastern turkeys in the big woods of the Northeast, Oceloas in Florida’s swamps, Merriam’s in mountain forests of the West or Gould’s in the high deserts, turkeys desperately need healthy habitat.

All animals do of course but some have done a much better of adapting to mans’ meddling of forest management, invasive exotics and urban sprawl.

And while there are urban centers where turkeys have adjusted, for the most part unlike whitetail deer and coyotes, turkeys need primo habitat to thrive.

If we can make the woods better for turkeys, it will be better for deer and the threatened Louisiana pine snake and the gopher tortoise and a host of other native wildlife desperately needing healthy ecosystems.

The National Wild Turkey Federation and various state fish and game departments have done an incredible job of turkey restoration and enhancement but they need the public’s help.

I have begun a quest to capture quality photographs of Rio Grande, Merriam’s, Eastern and Oceola in 2019.

Hunters call this quest the Grand Slam and while I will be taking a hunt or two this year, this quest is to document with a camera these great birds and to log everything discovered along the way.

I live a stone’s throw from Louisiana and a friend recently sent photos of eastern turkeys near their home.

Photos submitted by Maris Martinez inspired the author to look at Louisiana’s turkey population.

This inspired me to look more at Louisiana’s turkey population.

As of now it sits at 60,000 but that is down from a historic high of as many as 1,000,000 birds.

What happened?

Digging into these types of stories is what this is all about it. I’m calling it the Turkey Revolution and it will encompass years of research, reaching out to the public via many media platforms and searching out stories in the field.

If you have an interesting observation on wild turkeys, perhaps see a rare color phase bird or have anything related to them to share email me at chester@chestermoore.com.

Founding father Benjamin Franklin famously opined that the wild turkey would make a better representative of America than the bald eagle.

After all eagles are scavengers he said!

While I can’t see an image of the gobbling turkey intimidating America’s enemies, I can see the story of these great birds move the hearts of the public toward wanting healthier forests and more abundant wildlife of all types.

Putting a gobbler on a flag might have been a terrible way to cap the Revolutionary War but for a Turkey Revolution that might actually be pretty cool.

Chester Moore, Jr.